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HomeBreaking NewsWisconsin Education Leaders Against New Financial Literacy Requirement for High Schools

Wisconsin Education Leaders Against New Financial Literacy Requirement for High Schools

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Many schools in Wisconsin already teach personal finance. Rep. Alex Dallman wants to make it a required class worth one class credit.

The plan to require high school students in Wisconsin to learn about money and how to manage it in order to graduate from high school is running into opposition from the state’s education leaders.

The Department of Public Instruction is in opposition to AB 899, which would require all high schools in the state to teach financial literacy.

“We need to find a way to bring our education into the 21st Century, and teach our students stuff they need to learn to be successful in our economy,” Rep. Alex Dallman, R-Green Lake, explained to The Center Square on Tuesday.

DPI is open to teaching financial literacy but has concerns about making it a graduation requirement.

Rep. Alex Dallman said he is not really surprised that DPI and other education bureaucrats are opposed to his plan.

“School districts often complain about the money they don’t have, or how funding has decreased,” Dallman said. “But right now with all of the federal funds they have, they are sitting on piles and piles of cash.”

Rep. Alex Dallman said there are also outside groups that will partner with local schools. He said Next Gen Personal Finance is already working with Milwaukee Public Schools to teach financial literacy. Next Gen pays for the curriculum and training for MPS teachers to take the class.

Many schools in Wisconsin already teach personal finance. Rep. Alex Dallman wants to make it a required class worth one class credit.

Wisconsin requires 15 class credits for high schoolers to graduate. That includes four English or language arts credits, three math, three science, and three social studies credits, plus one-and-half physical education credits, and a half-credit in health.

“We want to listen to the rising pressure from parents who say we need to be teaching our kids some actual life lessons, and teaching them to be able to take responsibility over what they are doing so they don’t have to depend on the government when they grow-up.”

The Assembly Committee on Education held a hearing on Dallman’s plan on Tuesday. He’s not sure when it could come up for a vote in the full Assembly.


Assembly Bill 899

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